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and INSPIRATION for Difference Makers

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Schools have launched Social and Emotional Learning programs with SEL Launchpad

Click Here to Watch Video - R. Keeth Matheny, founder of "SEL Launchpad" from Gil Garcia on Vimeo.

Research Supporting Social and Emotional programs

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for every dollar spent you get a $11 benefit

"…For every dollar invested, there is a return of more than 11 dollars. The lead researcher told us “These are unprecedented returns, particularly given that, while the estimates of the costs are clear, only a portion of the possible benefits are captured.” Benefits include reductions in child aggression, substance abuse, delinquency, and violence; lower levels of depression and anxiety; and increased grades, attendance, and performance in core academic subjects."

This article presents findings from a meta-analysis of 213 school-based, universal Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) programs involving 270,034 kindergarten through high school students. Compared to controls, SEL participants demonstrated significantly improved social and emotional skills, attitudes, behavior, and academic performance that reflected an 11-percentile-point gain in achievement.

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IMPROVEMENT IN PROSOCIAL BEHAVIOR

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IMPROVEMENT IN ATTITUDE ABOUT SELF, OTHERS AND SCHOOL

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REDUCTION IN PROBLEM BEHAVIORS

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REDUCTION IN EMOTIONAL DISTRESS

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INCREASE IN STANDARDIZED ACHIEVEMENT TEST SCORE

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INCREASE IN SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL SKILLS

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The academic performance of students exposed to SEL programs was an average 13 percentile points higher than their non-SEL peers.

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Conduct problems, emotional distress, and drug use were all significantly lower for students exposed to SEL programs, and development of social and emotional skills and positive attitudes toward self, others, and school was higher.

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Higher high school graduation rates.

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Higher college graduation rates.

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Participants were less likely to have a clinical mental health disorder, less likely to be arrested or become involved in the juvenile justice system and had lower rates of sexually transmitted infections and pregnancies.

Six years later, a team that includes authors of the 2011 meta-analysis, has completed a new meta-analysis. The new findings were published on July 12th, 2017 in the peer-reviewed journal Child Development. The study analyzed results from 82 different interventions involving more than 97,000 students from kindergarten to high school, and the effects were assessed six months to 18 years after the programs ended.